History of Print Field Trip

It’s that time of year again! My History of Print class visited Craig Burkhalter’s studio at the Contemporary Arts Exchange to practice letterpress printing and bookbinding. As usual we were warmly welcomed and learned a lot. Check out the photos…

An MGSC alumna recently directed my attention to Laura Miller’s essay in Slate on “elitism” in literary culture. The piece was excellent and so were our former student’s comments on it. She noted having originally felt that her professors were “highfalutin’”…

The new president of Middle Georgia State College, Christopher Blake, addressed the Macon campus faculty on Thursday, Jan. 9. After his presentation, my colleague Dr. Nancy Bunker and I were asked for our thoughts by a reporter from the Macon…

I’ve been curious about the new Common Core standards for English language arts that recommend the teaching of more nonfiction texts (literary nonfiction but also informational texts) in the curriculum. The value of exposing students to as wide a variety…

It’s finals week here at MGSC and students are feeling the stress of that time in the semester when everything comes due at once. Some of that stress is an artifact of the academic calendar, but sometimes (let’s be honest,…

I have only two quarrels with this excellent article.  Well, maybe three. 1. I’m not sure we can unscramble the eggs of theory, identity, gender & ethnic studies, etc. I’m even less sure that we should. 2. Corollary to #1:…

“To me an English major is someone who has decided, against all kinds of pious, prudent advice and all kinds of fears and resistances, to major, quite simply, in becoming a person.” Preach it, Mark Edmundson.

Among the most frequently asked questions from my students: “Can we say ‘I’ in this paper?”  It’s obvious that they’ve often been taught an absolute prohibition on the first person singular pronoun in formal academic writing. But that prohibition is…

Look at this gorgeous video for the Paris study abroad program! There are no better ambassadors for the program than the students who participated.

Adam Gopnik’s pithy and optimistic treatment of the value of the English major is a gratifying addition to the nascent (?) genre of “English-studies apologia.” While you’re on the New Yorker site, check out “Foraging for Type,” look at the…