Knights Impact exploratory trip, day 1: Boarding and Departure from Miami—1 January 2017

This has been a busy and full day! By the time you read this entry it may be a couple of days in the past. I haven’t yet decided about buying wi-fi, which is pricey on the ship. But for me, a big part of the excitement of the trip is being on a cruise for the first time so I wanted to write down my first impressions—especially for students who may also be new to this type of travel.

The four of us who drove down from Orlando arrived and parked in Miami with plenty of time to board the Adonia before its 4:00 scheduled departure. At the port, we met up with the rest of our group (seven total) and dropped off our luggage—luggage is delivered to the cabins, which is handy. After a security screening process similar to that practiced at airports, we checked in. At check-in, an agent takes your picture and places a $100 hold on your credit/debit card against which your on-board purchases (if any) are debited. We received our “ship cards,” which function as the room key, identification, and quasi credit card for charging purchases to the on-board account.

Although we boarded the ship around 12:30, cabins were not yet ready. We were directed to lunch in the Conservatory, a buffet-style restaurant where I had a salad and a vegetable tagine over rice. It was a little hot and crowded, especially with everyone’s carry-on luggage around, but still very exciting and the food was tasty! I rushed through lunch because I was eager to take a look around the ship, take a few pictures, and send a few final text messages before we set off and I went out of cell range. I had time to walk around the various observation decks, get my photos, and then relax on a deck chair and watch the action around the pool for a little while before going to check out my cabin.

PortMiami behind us as we sailed

PortMiami behind us as we sailed

Looking off the aft end of the ship

Looking off the aft end of the ship

Looking down at the Lido Deck from the observation deck

Looking down at the Lido Deck from the observation deck

Since this sailing wasn’t full, we were fortunate to get balcony cabins with single occupancy. My cabin looks like a tiny hotel room with a queen bed, desk, small sofa, and quite a bit of storage. I packed light because (a) that’s my style and (b) the laundry, which is free, is down the hall. But there is room for a pretty extensive wardrobe if you want one. However, because of the nature of its programming, Fathom does not have a dress code—there’s no “formal night” and casual dress is accepted everywhere (although the Ocean Grill requests “smart casual” dress). The balcony is tiny, as everyone told me to expect, but it is exciting to always be able to hear and see the ocean, as well as to get a little solo chill-out time when needed. I unpacked and put my suitcase away, browsed the TV channels, and then heard a knock on my door. My cabin steward, Zenda, had come to introduce herself. I’m learning that cruise ship service, even on a ship like this one that doesn’t advertise “luxury,” is very attentive. There are tons of staff and everyone is incredibly courteous. Zenda is from the Phillipines; she says she likes Americans because we are friendly and we say what’s on our minds and not everyone is like that. Hopefully we can live up to Zenda’s impression of us.

My cabin

My cabin

Zenda also told me that a safety exercise was coming up; I was glad for the warning because I knew to expect the exercise but didn’t know how it would work. It was announced over the intercom (which is called a “tannoy” on the ship; is this a nautical word?) with instructions and then an alarm sounding. The exercise requires that everyone bring their life vests to a designated “muster station,” practice putting them on (and then taking them off), and listen to a briefing from the captain. Easy schmeezy and did not take too long. Let the record show that I refrained from blowing the whistle on my life vest, but some others did not.

Within about a half-hour of the safety briefing we got under way, sailing out of PortMiami with a beautiful sunset and view of Miami Beach. The wind on the observation deck was incredibly strong but I stayed for a long time, looking around and taking pictures. Then Fathom’s impact guides announced our first activity: visiting multiple areas around the deck to do certain things and collect stamps on a “passport.” I tied a bowline hitch (I will be very useful in a nautical emergency), placed a Polaroid of myself on a map of the world to show where I’d come from, added my answer to a question written on a window (“Who’s your muse?” Daniel!), and wrote a note for a fellow passenger to receive. These activities were a nice way to start thinking about the purposes of this trip: not just to help others but also to learn about ourselves and our place in the world.

Sailing away from Miami Beach as the sun set

Sailing away from Miami Beach as the sun set

The sun setting into the ocean as we sailed

The sun setting into the ocean as we sailed

Before I knew it, it was dinner time and I met up with our group in the Pacific Restaurant. This restaurant looks elegant (white tablecloths and multiple silverware) and serves elegant food, but somehow is not intimidating. I ate an endive salad, a vegetable omelet, and a chocolate pot de crème. Most interestingly, the waiter asked if I was a vegetarian and later sent the head waiter over to allow me to pre-order tomorrow’s lunch and dinner. A person could get used to this service! Over dinner we had a fantastic, lively and productive discussion about how best to make this program work for students. I am so happy to have such a great group of collaborators—we all listen, reflect, and learn from each other, which is exactly what collaboration should be.

This first afternoon/evening on the ship has been incredible. I’m not used to seeing the ocean around me in all directions, nor to how dark it is at night: our wake and some whitecaps are just visible in the ship’s lights. The rocking of the ship occasionally makes it hard to walk perfectly and I will admit (full disclosure) to one sudden onset of seasickness toward the end of dinner. It surprised me, as I assumed the motion of the ship would bother me right away if it was going to. But my dessert was rich; the restaurant is aft where there’s more movement; and the room had gotten hot and stuffy as it filled up with people. All at once I felt terrible and had to walk out, but as soon as I got fresh air I started to feel better. I walked around the pool deck, came back to my cabin and put my acupressure wristbands on (couldn’t hurt; might help), and eventually met back up with one of our group for a ginger ale (also couldn’t hurt; might help) and some further discussion. I’m sure I will adjust better once I’ve been on board a bit longer.

Tomorrow is a full day at sea with preparatory workshops and educational activities. It’s past 11 p.m. and I am planning to go to yoga at 9:30, so it’s time to turn in and be lulled to sleep by the sound of the ocean.

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