Knights Impact exploratory trip day 6: Departure from Amber Cove—6 January 2017

This is a sad day, friends. The Dominican Republic is behind me (for now). I am looking forward to getting home—and I’m already happy to be back on the open ocean—but it was surprisingly hard to leave Amber Cove this afternoon.

Most of my colleagues either had impact activities this morning or went out on their own. I was feeling too nervous about getting back to the ship on time as we’d been told very sternly that they would take up the gangway at 11:45. So I limited my adventuring to Amber Cove: cappuccino at El Cibao, people-watching by the pool, picking out souvenirs for Daniel, and studying today’s neighbor, the Carnival Pride. At lunchtime I had an interesting conversation with a gentleman who was very surprised I’d never cruised before. “I thought everyone had been on a cruise by now,” he said. “Well, now I have,” I told him. He confirmed something I suspected: that the Adonia is enjoyable in part because it actually feels like a ship. As he put it, the larger ships like the Pride feel like New York hotels. I can only imagine! I’ve also learned that it’s unusual for ships to stay in port for more than one night, or two at the most. Our neighbor yesterday arrived around 10 a.m. and was sailing away by 6:30 p.m. The Pride arrived at 7:00 and people were already getting back on board by the time we sailed (although they may just have been going back for lunch).

As it happened, our sailing was delayed about 90 minutes due to a medical emergency. I’m not sure exactly what happened but a passenger was evaluated by the ship’s doctors and they decided to admit him to hospital in Puerto Plata rather than having him sail back with us. An ambulance sat on the dock for quite a while and finally left followed by a security cart with the passenger’s luggage. I hope he is okay.  That’s a daunting prospect but I know the medical care on the ship is pretty comprehensive, so the problem must have been serious if they couldn’t treat it on board.

As soon as the ambulance pulled away, the gangway was removed and the signal given to undo the ropes that tied us to the dock. We moved away backwards—I was not entirely sure ships could back up, but neither did I think a tugboat could budge us—and everyone waved goodbye to the Pride passengers, the employees on the dock, and Amber Cove. I watched our departure from my balcony and probably got more sunburned doing that than I have on any of the impact activities! Once we got beyond the cove we turned (slightly weird feeling) and were off into the Atlantic, still on course for an on-time arrival in Miami on Sunday morning. I’d like to say I immediately headed to an educational and enlightening activity but in fact I took a nap!

Tonight we meet with Katie, Fathom’s programming manager, to discuss the student program in May. I’ve been working on and off all day on the program documentation and I am increasingly excited to start promoting everything to students while it’s still fresh in my mind.

Blog break for now. The computer screen in front of me and the ocean out the window to my right are getting my inner ear a little confused.


. . . Back after dinner with a steadier head now that we’ve been sailing a bit longer. Our meeting with Katie was excellent. She gave us some good suggestions about how to structure our program so that it meshes well with Fathom’s setup and about the best ways to get specific requests fulfilled. I’m sure we’ll be in constant contact with Fathom for the next couple of months as we finalize everything. Meanwhile we already have our disembarkation instructions for Sunday morning. Because we arrive into port so early, we have to put our luggage out for pickup tomorrow evening by 9 p.m. at the latest. Then we disembark in groups. Our group goes at 10:00 a.m., then we get the shuttle van back to our parking lot and on to Macon. Tomorrow we’ll attend a last activity or two and spend the rest of the day completing the program documentation so that we are ready to start promotions with a splash on Monday.

Speaking of a splash, I took pictures in Amber Cove and of our departure this afternoon:

I sit in the cheap seats at the pool!

I sit in the cheap seats at the pool!

I'm pretty proud of this photo.

I’m pretty proud of this photo.

 

Getting that last bit of pool time.

Getting that last bit of pool time.

Casting off lines...

Casting off lines…

Adios to the pilot and we are out to sea!

Adios to the pilot and we are out to sea!

The view from my balcony as we sailed.

The view from my balcony as we sailed.

Part of Amber Cove from the port side observation deck.

Part of Amber Cove from the port side observation deck.

How to slack off when you work on a ship--this Carnival Pride employee found a hiding place.

How to slack off when you work on a ship–this Carnival Pride employee found a hiding place.

From the starboard side observation deck while still in port.

From the starboard side observation deck while still in port.

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