Uffizi! Pitti! Ponte Vecchio! Pecorino!

As promised, I spent today at the Uffizi Gallery and then the Pitti Palace, getting a massive dose of art, history, and culture. Or rather, being confronted by the many gaps in my own education. The Medici: why were there so many of them? How were they allied to the other crowned heads of Europe (Hapsburg, Lorraine, Bourbon, etc.)? Why did so many end up in the Church? Were they all named Cosimo? Why can’t I tell saints apart in paintings or remember gods’ and goddesses’ attributes? Why is John the Baptist in so many paintings with the baby Jesus? I know what the Annunciation is but what’s the Assumption? Answers on a postcard, please.

I do think the Uffizi has the intended effect even if one does not know all the historical and religious details behind it. The sheer amount of art on view suggests the extent of the Medici family’s wealth, power, and influence. Seeing a Leonardo or a Caravaggio or a Velasquez is incredible, of course, but I was most impressed by the long hallways lined with portraits, busts, and statues: classical antiquity literally under the gaze of powerful Renaissance figures. The Pitti shows off the dynastic excess of the Medici in a whole different way. Room after room of frescoed ceilings, silk-hung walls, paintings, decorative arts, jewelry, and more. After a while I wondered if they ever got tired of looking at it all. Did any Medici ever long for an Ikea couch and plain white walls? Anyway, since I was on my own I just stayed for as long as I wanted, took pictures of things I thought were interesting, and took breaks when I felt like it. I highly recommend this approach to museum-going, especially since there’s so much to see that you’re bound to miss something and should not feel bad when that’s the case.

So the rest of this post will be my pictures with captions—definitely not a knowledgeable tour of the Uffizi and Pitti given by an expert art historian. In fact, if you are reverent about art, you may get annoyed with me! Don’t forget to click and enlarge the pictures.

Portraits along the crown molding and busts alternating with statues, all the way down three long hallways.

Portraits of the Duke & Duchess of Urbino. The placard described their appearance as “completely unruffled by emotion or anxiety” but I think they just look supercilious.

La Tribuna: if the Uffizi is extra, the Tribuna is EXTRA extra. I read that in the 18th century it was a popular stop on the Grand Tour. Judging by the crowds, some things never change.

The domed ceiling of the Tribuna, inlaid with shells.

Alongside the Tribuna is a room of miniature classical statues and other curiosities including this “big toe broken off from a monumental statue.”

Looking out a window at Uffizi–you can see how long those long hallway galleries are.

The Uffizi is full of Holy Family paintings but this one caught my attention because they seem to be reading to baby Jesus. Good parenting!

 

The Cranach portraits of Martin Luther and his wife. Don’t they just look like people who could invent Protestantism?

Madonna and Child paintings are all over the Uffizi as well, but this one distinguishes itself by making its subjects look extremely unappealing.

Looking toward the Duomo from the Uffizi balcony.

I submit that Titian only had one dog, who was very sleepy, and he wanted to put it in all his pictures.

Ignore the gory beheading and look at Judith and her maid’s faces. That no-nonsense look is so familiar to any woman who has ever cleaned up vomit, taken innards out of a turkey, or washed hockey gear. No surprise that a woman painted it: Artemisia Gentileschi.

I love (a) “night light” paintings and (b) Annunciation scenes in which Mary looks extremely nonplussed.

Now we go from the Uffizi to the Pitti. Come along!

This is the Ponte Vecchio. Easy to imagine a time when all the bridges over the Arno (and the Seine, etc.) were occupied with these chockablock little shops or homes.

The costume gallery at Palazzo Pitti. This is an exhibit about dialogues between art and fashion.

YES PLZ

Ballgown with pockets!

Jacket with Florence on it

I just love 18C portraits. And portraits in general, really.

An enormous 19th-century music box

The plaque says this is some Grand Duke or other but this is clearly Prince Albert from _Victoria_ and I will not be told otherwise.

Not physically like our dog Zouki at all, but definitely a similar attitude!

Looking up the “Monumental Staircase” in the Pitti.

Looking up from the Pitti courtyard toward the Giardino Boboli, which I missed visiting because of the intermittent rain.

This painting is a Botticelli and therefore Important, but I want to shout back through time at the model, “STAND UP STRAIGHT!”

This is about the time when I started to think wistfully of midcentury modernism.

I always meet friends at these museums.

“What? These are my casual reading clothes.”

Curtained beds give me the yips.

Ferdinando III, whose “traveling nécessaire” this was, did not subscribe to the elitist culture of packing light.

This is a salt cellar. When my grandmother collected salt cellars they did not look like this!

Finally found a Medici family tree (hand-drawn in 1699) on display around 3 p.m. after needing one all day. They should hand out copies at the entrance.

Outside the Pitti. It’s pretty forbidding-looking.

And back to my hotel via some window shopping and at least one cappuccino (not pictured):

Dostoevsky wrote _The Idiot_ in this house.

Looking down the Arno from the Ponte Vecchio.

One last attempt to get the whole Duomo complex in one picture. I’m pretty proud of this shot.

Now back from my last dinner in Florence (*snif*) and I must recommend my new favorite antipasto:

Pecorino Romano with honey and thyme. Eat this immediately!

And so to bed. Thanks for coming along on my all-Medici day! Tomorrow I leave Florence at a time so early that I refuse to think about it right now. I’d rather go to bed tonight with visions of great artworks dancing in my head.

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